Yesterday I noted that Republicans want to make gun-buying easy but voting hard (at least where that will help them win).  But the Republican in this radio ad doesn’t want gun-buying to be easy for everybody.

BOWLES (OF SIMPSON-BOWLES) ON THE ROMNEY BUDGET

Here, in the Washington Post:

. . . This month, Romney said that his tax reform proposal is “very similar to the Simpson-Bowles plan.” How I wish it were. I will be the first to cheer if Romney decides to embrace our plan. Unfortunately, the numbers say otherwise: His reform plan leaves too many tax breaks in place and, as a result, does nothing to reduce the debt. . . . The Romney plan, by sticking to revenue-neutrality and leaving in place tax breaks, would raise taxes on the middle class and do nothing to shrink the deficit.

KRUGMAN ON RYAN’S BUDGET

Here, in the New York Times:

. . . if we add up Mr. Ryan’s specific proposals, we have $4.3 trillion in tax cuts, partially offset by around $1.7 trillion in spending cuts — with the tax cuts, surprise, disproportionately benefiting the top 1 percent, while the spending cuts would primarily come at the expense of low-income families. Over all, the effect would be to increase the deficit by around two and a half trillion dollars. . . .

. . . What Mr. Ryan actually offers are specific proposals that would sharply increase the deficit, plus an assertion that he has secret tax and spending plans that he refuses to share with us [that would cut it].

THE TIMES’ TAKE ON IT

Here:

. . . More than three-fifths of the cuts proposed by Mr. Ryan come from programs for low-income Americans. These cuts are so severe that the nation’s Catholic bishops protested the proposal as failing to meet society’s moral obligations, saying the plans “will hurt hungry children, poor families, vulnerable seniors.”

. . . Mr. Ryan’s budget would not reach a surplus for 30 years, according to the C.B.O., because he would cut taxes, largely for the rich and for corporations, by $4 trillion. . . .

CONSERVATIVE BILL KRISTOL ON ROMNEY’S TAX BURDEN

He thinks it’s too low.  Not (as Paul Ryan believes) too high.  Watch.

 

 

Comments are closed.